Update! New videos

Update! New videos

YAY! New Videos, just what you’ve always wanted, right? On these cold winter days, it’s difficult to get outside to play and juggle. Instead, I play inside! You may know that I love video edit, juggling and clowning and these things go really well together. Here are some of my latest videos! VTG transforming contact juggling into poi theory   The Mirror  Thomas and I clowning around in the Rave Cave   Traveling video of 8 countries through...
Bilbo Baggins Syndrome

Bilbo Baggins Syndrome

  Leaving home for the first time is a magical journey filled with adventure. When you are far away, you dream about the things you miss; your mom’s cooking, your old coffee shops, the weekends with your friends. When you first leave you just don’t consider the changes that will happen while you’re gone. Your memories of the old town doesn’t change, but the people back home do. The old cafe closes down, your weekend friends have children, you mom moves an hour outside of the place you grow up. You finally return from all the fun adventures and difficult patches you’ve had over your journey. You see the accumulation of a billion tiny changes that happened since you left. Each person you know is different and so is the landscape around you. You hear the phrase “this place has changed a lot since I was young”… it’s true everywhere. Nobody really understands the things you have seen and they rarely wish to hear about the new ideas you have found. Everyone refers to your old identity; a person you don’t even remember being anymore. They talk to you as if you still are that person. All the once unfamiliar things in far away places have now become familiar. All that was once familiar is now strange. You thought you knew them. They think they know you. Everything you once knew well now is now a novelty. You see it all with new eyes. You know yourself better for returning, yet feel out of place and disconnected because it’s no longer home, these are no longer the people who...

French Language Faux Pas

Speaking a foreign language here has allowed some hilarious moments of serious miscommunications that go way beyond basic politeness. Okay, so I get my tu’s and vous’s mixed up all the time, but that is easily forgiven by anyone who knows you’re a foreigner (and believe me they know). However, I recommend you don’t say a few of the things I have said while I am here. Debit Card This one is very easily mistaken in any interaction when using your bank card to pay. The French language usually does not pronounce the last letters in a word, and des bits sounds a lot like debit. When you are paying at a cashier, I recommend saying “I would like to pay by card, please.” Par carte si vous plait, instead of “I would like to pay with a bag of dicks, please”. Par des bits si vous plait. Duck This is more my own difficulty in hearing the enunciation in vowels than a common difficulty. Perhaps I shouldn’t be asking for french lessons from my boyfriend’s parents when I ask questions like “why do people use the word duck so violently?” If someone is yelling at you in the street calling you a duck; canard, they are not saying duck. They are calling you an asshole; connard. This is not asshole grease. The Cat The french language has a gendered pronoun for every noun, and you have to learn the pronoun with each noun or they will not understand what you are saying. So, diligently, in school I learned my le (male) and my la (female) with each noun,...

Daily differences of living in France

It is incredibly lucky to be living in France, the country of love, of beauty and a rich cultural history. But the learning curve during any kind of immigration is high, and some of my ideological values oppose the values this culture espouses. More than that, some of the daily cultural tasks take some getting used to. Here are a few things that’s taken me 8 months to find anywhere close to normal. 1. Shutters Photo from AlicekeysMD – she loves shutters France loves barricading themselves into their house. They have gates they lock and shutters they close after dark every night. It’s pure black rooms where you can’t see yourself go to the bathroom at night. I find it terrifying and disorienting inside my own house. My boyfriend has learned to keep all the shutters open for me, and let the dim light in the moon shine in when the insomnia kicks in. Thank goodness – the pure black is just too much. I love waking up to the natural light on my face, and the experience of shutters-closed awakenings leaves me groggy nearly all day. 2. Locking from the inside Again, barricading from the inside, the French make sure no one can get in or out of their domicile in any hurry. Considering how often I lose my keys with my ADD brain, I’ve managed to lock myself in the house on countless occasions. Canadian locks don’t need keys from the inside, and the level of anxiety I feel when I can’t get out of the house is incredible. I lived in a family that didn’t lock...
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